Chris De Jabet, writing on the 1Password blog:

We learned from customer feedback that some people would make a vault named Archive and move these items there, and others were storing those items in the Trash. While both solutions work, neither was ideal. That’s why we’re rolling out the new Archive feature in our latest updates.

For the longest time, I’ve had an ‘Archive’ vault in 1Password to hold old items that I no longer used, but still wanted to store in 1Password to reference. Items such as old server passwords, accounts from sites that are now dead or moved, random secure notes, etc. were all moved to this ‘Archive’ vault. I can finally delete that vault now that 1Password has native support for the Archive.

Another password-related bug has been discovered in macOS High Sierra, this time in the App Store Preferences in the Settings.app.

Joe Rossignol, reporting for MacRumors, says:

The security vulnerability means that anyone with administrator-level access to your Mac could unlock the App Store preferences and enable or disable settings to automatically install macOS updates, app updates, system data files, and, ironically, even security updates that would fix a bug like this one.

This sounds really embarrassing for Apple, but this is far from being a major bug. First, the App Store preferences are unlocked by default for admin users — and it doesn’t work for/affects the non-admin users. Additionally, if anyone with malicious intent has admin access to your Mac, there’s a lot worse that is possible. That’s not to say that this bug shouldn’t be taken seriously. Apple has already fixed this bug in the beta of its upcoming High Sierra release.

I’d love to join Apple’s QA team. Seriously!

WordPress 4.3 Beta is now ready for testing and the team has listed the notable changes arriving with version 4.3. This one below is really good to have.

We put a lot of work into Better Passwords throughout WordPress. Now, WordPress will limit the life time of password resets, no longer send passwords via email, and generate and suggest secure passwords for you.

I wish Automattic themselves offered a Two-Step Authentication plugin for self-hosted WordPress installations.