Joost de Valk, writing on the WordPress.org blog:

WordPress now powers over 1/3rd of the top 10 million sites on the web according to W3Techs. Our market share has been growing steadily over the last few years, going from 29.9% just one year ago to 33.4% now. We are, of course, quite proud of these numbers!

and

Over the years WordPress has become the CMS of choice for more and more people and companies. As various businesses use WordPress, the variety of WordPress sites grows. Large enterprise businesses all the way down to small local businesses: all of them use WordPress to power their site. We love seeing that and we strive to continuously make WordPress better for all of you.

So stoked to see the rise of WordPress.

WordPress Celebrates its 15th Anniversary Today

15 Years of WordPress

On May 27, 2003 — exactly fifteen years ago today, the first version of WordPress was made available for download. Unlike most software releases that start at v1.0, this was Version 0.7 of WordPress that was being released as the first non-beta.

What began as a fork of b2/cafelog over 15 years ago has today turned into a robust, reliable and popular Content Management System that powers close to 30% of the world’s top 10 million websites.

WordPress holds a very special place in my life and I’ve been building websites powered by WordPress since 2006. Although I’m not a fan of the clunky mess that WordPress is turning into, I still love building with WordPress and couldn’t be more excited about the years to come.

Emily Schechter, Chrome Security Product Manager writing on the Chromium Blog:

For the past several years, we’ve moved toward a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt HTTPS encryption. And within the last year, we’ve also helped users understand that HTTP sites are not secure by gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as “not secure”. Beginning in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68, Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as “not secure”.

This is fantastic, and I whole-heartedly welcome this move.

If you have a website, there’s no real reason why you’re still not using https. Services like Let’s Encrypt make it super easy to do so, and if your host doesn’t support them (or any alternative) yet, it’s time to move.

At the very least, go sign up for CloudFlare and start using the Free SSL option.

Cloudflare Gets Ready for a Massive Expansion in 2018 with Two New Data Centers in India

Matthew Prince, CEO of Cloudflare, announces their 120th data center in Salt Lake City, Utah and says the company has planned a “massive expansion” for 2018.

We have big plans. By the end of the year, we’re forecasting that we’ll have facilities in 200 cities and 100 countries worldwide. Twelve months from now we expect that 95% of the world’s population will live in a country with a Cloudflare data center.

In the post linked above, I noticed the network map includes five (maybe six) dots for India.

Cloudflare Network Map for India

Cloudflare Network Map for India

This includes the three existing Cloudflare data centers in New Delhi, Mumbai, and Chennai, which the company launched in November 2015. The fourth dot, seen in Orange, looks like a new data center in progress in or around Nagpur in central India. Similarly, the fifth dot, seen in teal here looks like a new data center in or close to Bengaluru planned for sometime in 2018. It also looks like Cloudflare will be launching a new data center in Nepal.

As someone who lives in Mumbai and builds websites for clients — the majority of whom are located in the Indian subcontinent, I’m incredibly excited about all this.