Bron Gondwana, CEO of FastMail, explains on the company blog why “Now more than ever, it’s time for email.

He says,

Through all the interruptions and turmoil in your life, email is a constant. Everyone has email, and every email system can email every other. It lets us stay connected, but doesn’t demand an immediate response. You can read it in your own time, and have the space to craft a thoughtful reply.

The beauty of Email is that you can use it in your own way. While it’s a great form of asynchronous communication, it’s also a fantastic tool for collaborating with your team and getting work done much faster. At Readdle, we have been working on some exceptional new things for Spark that we can’t wait to show you.

I have been using FastMail as my primary email service provider for several years now, and it is worth every $$. It’s great to see an email service so focused on privacy and core email experience. FastMail has been rock solid over the years and I urge you to consider it. If you sign up using this link, you’ll get 10% off.

Backblaze has just announced that it’s cloud storage service B2 is getting S3 compatible APIs. This is a massive release that makes the low-cost service compatible with tons of products, services, plugins, and apps out there.

For reference, B2 pricing starts at just $0.005/GB/month compared to $0.021/GB/month offered by Amazon.

Jacob Kastrenakes has a lovely article up on The Verge explaining the new 6GHz Wi-Fi and what is means to consumers. If you remember, 6GHz Wi-Fi was supposed to be named Wi-Fi 6, but as it turns out, sensible naming for technology is a very rare trait.

Devices are expected to start supporting 6GHz Wi-Fi by the end of 2020, so its implementation isn’t far away. When it arrives, expect to see it branded under the name “Wi-Fi 6E.”

Realistically speaking, Wi-Fi 6 devices won’t be common till 2022 at least.

But what exactly is Wi-Fi 6E? Jacob explains:

To get a little more specific, the FCC is opening up 1,200MHz of spectrum in the 6GHz band. For the past two decades, Wi-Fi has been operating with roughly 400MHz of spectrum, and all available channels had to be split up within that limited space. Channels on the 6GHz band are expected to be 160MHz each in size. Only two channels at that size could fit inside the currently available airspace.

This sounds exciting. As someone who lives in an over-populated vertical city like Mumbai, I’m stoked. I currently use 3 Netgear Orbi devices in my house, and will happily switch to whatever reasonable 6E range Netgear releases in India.

Mark Gurman, Debby Wu, and Ian King writing for Bloomberg:

[Apple] is working on three of its own Mac processors, known as systems-on-a-chip, based on the A14 processor in the next iPhone. The first of these will be much faster than the processors in the iPhone and iPad, the people said.

Apple is preparing to release at least one Mac with its own chip next year, according to the people.

ARM-based Macs have been rumored for a long time, but Bloomberg’s team has some exciting news:

The first Mac processors will have eight high-performance cores, codenamed Firestorm, and at least four energy-efficient cores, known internally as Icestorm. Apple is exploring Mac processors with more than 12 cores for further in the future, the people said.

Imagine a world where running 12+ cores is common.