Arq Backup Version 6 is Now Available

Haystack Software has announced the release of Arq Backup Version 6 — a major update to the backup app for macOS.

Michael Tsai has a written a fantastic overview about this release, so you should go ahead and read that first. Although I’ve been a SuperDuper! user for the longer time, I had been considering making a switch to Arq every now and then. Both apps are vastly different, and I was looking to use Arq to back up selective data from my primary machine, which is the 2016 MacBook Pro. However, Version 6 is a strict no-go for me, as Michael notes:

The bad news is that the app you interact with is now built with Electron. (The background agent process that does the work remains Objective-C.) The problems with Electron range from the superficial (everything just looks and feels off) to the functional (you can’t navigate outline views with the arrow keys or type-selection).

A lot of people are unhappy with the switch to Electron:

Marc Edwards tweets:

Agreed. This is absolutely a dealbreaker for me. If Electron stays, I go.

Peter Steinberger tweets:

Arq 6 is now Electron-based? ?

Joseph P. Hillenburg tweets:

Long time user: Use of @ElectronJS is a severe impediment to usability. Example: https://josephg.com/blog/electron-is-flash-for-the-desktop/

René Fouquet tweets:

Another crappy electron replacement for a once native Mac app. This just makes me sad, both as a user as well as a developer. This cross-platform disease has to die. Needless to say I’m not going to upgrade to Arq 6. I’ve been using Arq for ten years, but I’m not supporting this.

Now, I understand that the switch to Electron is just for the main UI, while the core backup agent is still Obj-C on the Mac. And the developers, who need to build both a Windows and Mac app, probably picked a method that they thought was best for them. But being a native app was what was so good about Arq.

Moreover, version 6 is also a big departure in terms of the familiar UI. Arq just doesn’t look and feel like the Arq everyone knew and loved. There are several complaints on Twitter about bugs and missing features. The makers are inspired by an improved mockup of the UI and are considering making improvements.

I’m very grateful to @mohrstudio for mocking up some ideas about an Arq UI. Very inspirational. Planning to rework Arq 6 so the layout is more like Arq 5, but more usable

As for me, Arq 6 was going to be my first dive into the app, and I just don’t want to make my first few interactions with the app through the utter shit that is Electron. I’ll definitely be waiting it out for a few updates and releases. Thankfully, the developers are hard at work releasing bug fixes and improvements to Arq 6.

Backblaze Raises its Subscription Prices, But it’s Still Well Worth It

Let’s face it — Backups are IMPORTANT.

There are no two ways of looking at it. You either have backups, or you’re fucked! If not today, then tomorrow.

Without backups, you’re living a risky life that doesn’t value the data you have. Your important files, photos of your loved ones, client files, app preferences, the files you’ve downloaded over the years — they’ll all be gone one day if you don’t have backups.

I have been using Backblaze — a popular online backup service, for many years now. Backblaze has been providing unlimited personal backup service for $5/mon. Whether you have a Mac or a PC, whether you have a measly 128GB SSD in your Mac or whether your PC is stuffed with Muti-terabytes of Hard Drives, Backblaze will back it all up for just $5/month or $50/year. Not only can you do a full restore of your backup — via multiple reliable methods — in the event of a horrible data loss, but you can also log into the website to browse and download individual files, remotely, whenever you want.

These are easily the best $5 you’ll spend in a month to get a feature-rich and reliable backup service for your computer. If you’re in India, that’s less than ₹10 a day, or about the cost of a cutting chaai.

Earlier this week, Gleb Budman — Co-Founder and CEO of Backblaze — announced some changes to the subscription pricing of Backblaze, starting next month. The company is raising the prices of the subscription by $1 month — that’s right, by a dollar.

Monthly Plan: $5 → $6
Yearly Plan: $50 → $60
Two-Year Plan: $100 → $110

This is the first change in pricing since the launch of the service in 2008, over 10 years ago.

Gleb explains why they had to raise the subscription:

The short answer is that we have enhanced the service in many ways and storage costs have gone up. We have continually removed impediments to getting data backed up — no file size restrictions, speeding up uploads, all while data sets have grown larger and larger. We’ve worked hard to avoid raising our prices, which resulted in some great storage innovations and has allowed us to keep our original prices for more than a decade. By making this decision now, we are ensuring we can continue to offer unlimited backup and keep improving our Computer Backup service. I’d like to go into further detail on the two primary sources of our increased costs: 1) enhancements to the service, and 2) the market cost of storage.

Even at $6/m, Backblaze is a fantastic purchase that everyone should be using. Take a look at some of the comments by customers on the blog post announcing this change. People sure are crazy!

If you still aren’t convinced, here are my top three reasons why Backblaze is worth it!

  1. You get Unlimited Backups. I’m currently backing up close to 12TBs of data to the service.
  2. You can Remotely Access and Download any file or folder from your backed up data, using their website. They even give you mobile apps to download files up to 5GB.
  3. You get Native Apps for your Mac or PC that comes with a whole bunch of features to help you efficiently upload your data. You can throttle your uploads depending on how much bandwidth you have or want the app to use, and you’ll need this for that initial batch of uploads.
  4. You can Offload Files to B2 for permanent storage and free up space from your computer. This is especially useful if you work with video projects and have old archival data. Sure, additional B2 pricing applies, but it’s super cheap.

If you aren’t already using Backblaze, do sign up using this link and you’ll get a whole month of Backblaze for Free.

TechCrunch, reporting on the GitLab.com meltdown this morning:

According to The Register a folder containing 300GB of live production data was erroneously deleted by a GitLab sysadmin — with just 4.5GB remaining by the time the delete command was cancelled.

Holy shit!

Mad props to the team at GitLab for owning up about their mistake and being so open and upfront about the status.